history

Church Hall

The new Parish Church was built in Wester Aberdour in 1790.The Rev. Robert Johnstone instigated the conversion of the church in the High Street into the Church Hall after St Fillan’s was re-consecrated in 1926.

The Hall continues to be well used by many and varied community groups including the Beavers, Brownies, Cubs, Guides and Scouts. Community activities include monthly lunches; regular talks;

The original entrance gate and path is to the east.This gate was moved to the centre when the church was converted to a hall.

Note the gallery and pillars.

The original entrance door was from the north east corner under the gallery.

Wooden pews facing the pulpit – which was on the south wall.

When converted to a hall this area had a stage and full curtains.

The four windows were on the south side (facing the road) and one was later made into the current entrance door.

The design of these windows is called Diamond Quarry.

This information was provided by the Aberdour Heritage Centre.

In 1910 the clock was erected by the inhabitants of Aberdour in memory of Dr Robert Spence, their friend and Physician for nearly 40 years. It was moved to its current position to make way for the War Memorial.

The wall has been lowered, the gates are in the centre of the building in front of the War memorial and the entrance doorway is now under the left hand window.

history

War Memorial

The memorial commemorates both the 1914-1918 and 1939-1945 wars. The unveiling ceremony and dedication of the monument held on the 8 November 1920 were attended by the Countess of Elgin, Rev. R Johnstone, Rev. G Brown and Rev. I Davis. A second dedication was held on the 10 November 1946 attended by Rev. D M G Stalker. The inscription now reads: REMEMBER THE MEN OF ABERDOUR WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE GREAT WAR 1914-1919 (Names) THEY FOUGHT AND DIED IN THE CAUSE OF FREEDOM PROPATRIA 1939-1945.

Makers of the monument were: Mr FW Deas and Mr Thomas Beattie, Edinburgh and Messrs W and A Moyes.

World War One – names, rank and regiment of the 29 Aberdour men listed who died. None of those who served returned home. World War Two -The 17 men who did not return to Aberdour.

This information was provided by the Aberdour Heritage Centre.

history

Geoffrey Charles Tasker Keyes

The plaque on the church hall says, “Lieutenant-Colonel Geoffrey Charles Tasker Keyes V.C. M.C. Croix de Guerre. Born in Aberdour on 18th March 1917 killed in action on 18th November 1941 while leading the 11th Scottish Comando raid on General Rommel’s rear headquarters in Libya.”

He was the son of  Rear Admira Sir Roger Keyes (a veteran of the Zeebrugge and Dover raids) and lived at Whitehill, Aberdour during WW1.

The plaque was unveiled by his brother Roger George Bowlby Keyes exactly 50 years after he was killed.

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History

The Early Years

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Restoration

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Stained Glass

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Inchcolm Abbey

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Church Hall

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The Hewitt Brothers

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